Programs

Cross Creek Pet Health Clinic

Posted by in Events, Events Past, Programs

Cross Creek Pet Health Clinic

Thank you to the Cross Creek Condominium Association and Community Events Committee!   Thanks for inviting SNAP 2 IT back in January for our 2nd Pet Heath Clinic at Cross Creek. We had a great time and meet many wonderful pet parents and some adorable dogs and cats! Dr. Karen Colson and Violet Covarrubias, along with volunteers Nancy Kelly, Sally Leath, Kendra Cuffe did wonderful job helping keep everyone happy and it was an eventful day filled with lots of great fun. We look forward to hosting another event in the fall of 2015. SNAP is a non-profit 501c3 animal rescue organization dedicated to spay and neutering programs, rescues and adoptions for Atlanta-area pets. See more about us here or follow us on Facebook for the latest updates on SNAP people, pets and adoption news. First posted March 15, 2015....

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SNAP – Supporting Inner Harbour Therapy Dogs since 2010

Posted by in Education, Events Past, Good news, Media, Programs

SNAP – Supporting Inner Harbour Therapy Dogs since 2010

The Youth Villages Inner Harbour Campus in Douglasville, GA is one of Georgia’s largest psychiatric residential treatment programs for emotionally challenged children. Serving young people throughout the Southeast since 1962, the Inner Harbour Campus is nonprofit and merged with Youth Villages in the fall of 2009. The woodland setting of the Inner Harbour Campus sits on 1,200 acres just west of Atlanta and offers a therapeutic environment for a wide variety of special needs children. The campus includes a lake, a sports field, running track and playgrounds for recreational activities. The also have many great hiking trails, canoeing activities, a ropes course and equine therapy program with several horses, and five therapy dogs know as the “Inner Harbour Five” or the “Inner Harbour Hounds.” Since 2010, SNAP has been proud to provide food for these very special therapy dogs. Youth Villages uses therapy animals at the Inner Harbour campus to teach children and youth about responsibility, empathy, trust, and relational self-confidence. Inner Harbour staff also report that the dogs have a calming effect on children in the program and can help make them more open to discussion. As so often happens with rescue dogs, the therapy animal program has benefited the dogs just as much as the children. You can read more about Inner Harbour here. If you want more information or wish to help SNAP continue to help these dogs, and other animals in the Greater Atlanta area, please visit our SNAP website for more information or find us on Facebook. SNAP has been providing food for the five “Harbour Hounds” Chance, Princess, Sparky, Max, and Brown Bear for five years now. Inner Harbour and the therapy dog program has a special place the heart of Kyla Jones, the founder of SNAP. Her son went to Inner Harbour many years ago and benefited a great deal from the program. “It was a wonderful experience where he learned a lot and really came out of his shell thanks to all the good work of the Inner Harbour staff and especially the horses and fishing,” Ms. Jones explained. Years later the Inner Harbour Five showed up at Inner Harbour – the staff contacted SNAP and they have been helping support these very special dogs ever since. Princess (likely a border collie mix) was found wandering around the Inner Harbour campus when a group of kids found her during a hike. Abandoned by her owner, it took Princess awhile to adjust to her new home (not really interacting with the other dogs, scared to be near them), but she has adjusted well and now loves to start barking contests with all the dogs. Max (a beagle mix) was abandoned on the side of the road and lived alone for an unknown period of time before someone rescued him and brought him to Inner Harbour where he has been ever since. He seems to have a smile on his face whenever the kids go to the kennels to feed and visit him. He puts a smile on the kid’s faces every time they see him because he gets so excited when they are there. We think it’s because he thinks he’s going to be fed each time some kids go visit him. Brown Bear (a lab, German Shepard mix) has been at Youth Villages since she was a puppy. Abandoned with her sister, the pair have found a loving home at Inner Harbour for the past 10 years. Brown Bear (named by the staff when she was a puppy) is a sweet, gentle and very caring dog who loves to have her...

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Humpty Dumpty’s Great Fall

Posted by in Donate, Education, Events Past, Feral Colonies, Media, Programs

Humpty Dumpty’s Great Fall

UPDATE: Humpty Dumpty has been released to a new managed colony and is living well as a feral. PREVIOUSLY: On Saturday SNAP took Humpty Dumpty to our favorite vet for an x-ray to check on his leg. The vet found that no bones were broken, however he does have a hairline fracture near his knee and a torn muscle in his back right leg. He will be on pain meds, anti-inflammatories and cage rest for four to six weeks. And is expected now to make a full recovery. Cost for vet and meds are expected to be about $300. Please help us to meet this goal and put Humpty Dumpty back together again. Click on the image above to donate online. ORIGINAL: Meet SNAP’s newest family member, Humpty Dumpty, shown here in a photo taken behind Suburban lodge on Shallowford Road. Although in the photograph it may look like Humpty Dumpty is a skilled ginger climber, bounding down a country fence, that’s not the case at all. Humpty Dumpty isn’t moving in this image. He’s motionless. He’s stuck. And he’s injured. Earlier today, a feral colony caregiver spotted Humpty in this very position, hanging upside down, one leg wedged between the weathered wooden boards that make up this jagged fence. Judging by his condition, Humpty had been in that position for a few days and was in agony, hungry, thirsty, and scared. One of SNAP’s favorite veterinarian partners came to our aid. After Humpty Dumpty was sedated, we untangled him from the fence and rushed him to the office to assess his injuries. Humpty Dumpty is a feral kitty that is a member of an established colony where he’s been cared for recently. His ear is tipped, and he’s been fixed and has had some basic veterinary care. Until Humpty Dumpty had a great fall, his life as a feral was going along just fine. As you can imagine, Humpty Dumpty’s leg is severely injured. We are unsure yet if his mangled haunch and leg will have to be amputated or can be saved. Life as a feral “tripod” – animal lovers’ affectionate name for 3-legged animals – is significantly different than life as a domesticated feline tripod. Feral tripods are at a huge disadvantage when it comes to escaping from two – or four – legged threats. This means that if Humpty Dumpty loses his leg, he will need to be rehomed into a safer feral environment. SNAP believes that unlike the nursery rhyme Humpty Dumpty, all the king’s horses and all the king’s men can put this Humpty Dumpty back together again. We just need your help to do it. You can also pre-apply to adopt Humpty Dumpty online here. First posted 1-16-2014....

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Dekalb County TNR Program Fixes Cat Population

Posted by in Education, Events, Events Past, Featured, Media, Programs

Dekalb County TNR Program Fixes Cat Population

Mass target TNR (Trap Neuter Return) Community Program in Dekalb County. Best Friends has been officially helping the cats of DeKalb County, Georgia, through our cat initiatives since August, 2011. The cornerstone of this community cat program is the public/private partnership, where DeKalb County Animal Services and Enforcement http://www.dekalbcountyanimalservices.com/ releases the community cats (aka feral cats) to the program where they are fixed by Lifeline Animal Project lifelineanimal.org and then returned to the community from whence they came– the program also brings other animal welfare organizations to the table to help address the whole situation as strategically as possible. A recent mass trap-neuter-return project united forces to help spay and neuter almost 60 cats where it was desperately needed, a low rent apartment complex. Field work Back in April, the DeKalb Community Cat Program added “field work” to their services. Previously the program was just taking cats that had already been picked up by animal control and transferred into the program from the shelter. Now, we are working more closely with the community by going out to address cat nuisance calls, where we’re picking up the cats directly from the streets, getting them spayed/neutered and returned. By foregoing the shelter system altogether, we’re helping streamline the process, while keeping the shelter’s cages open to help more cats and cultivating relationships with the people who will, ultimately, make this program a sustainable success. “The field work will allow us to work more cohesively in the community and have a greater impact on the number of cats we reach,” says Janet Samuel, community cat coordinator. “To ramp up our efforts we’re also doing some mass TNR projects, our first one was done at the beginning of July and went without a hitch thanks to partnering with SNAP-2 IT. They provided the logistics, brought volunteers and also paid for the trapping food and recovery services post surgeries, while we paid for the surgeries, it is a wonderful partnership for the cats.” Mass TNR, it’s a Snap! The mass TNR project which saw dozens of cats all fixed and returned, went beautifully thanks to the work of Kyla Jones, director of SNAP 2 IT. www.snap2it.org – Their organization is dedicated to increasing save rates for the area’s municipal shelters through spay and neuter services, which they offer for free to the public. Since their inception in 2009, they have trapped-neutered-returned over 1,500 cats and Kyla understands the importance of focusing resources to get a whole colony fixed at once. “This high volume TNR project targeted five apartment complexes, all under the same management company,” shares Kyla. “They were very cooperative, they’ve been doing spot trapping, where 2 – 7 cats have been fixed per week by a colony caregiver, but it wasn’t making a dent in their cat populations.” SNAP 2-IT also brought some amazing volunteers to make the most of the event. “I came out to help because cat overpopulation is a problem that has to be addressed and trap/spay/neuter/release is the most realistic way to control this,” shares volunteer Farrar Seymour. “To ignore these innocent animals, in my eyes, is just as cruel as killing them. If we do not work to control the rate of reproduction in feral cat communities, we are absolutely giving them a sentence of suffering and death.” “TNR helps slow the process of over-population before it begins and it is very rewarding to know that is the service I am helping provide these animals,” says Helen Preston, on why she volunteered for the event. The program will continue to have more mass TNR projects and looks...

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TNR, Marietta Colony (September 2012)

Posted by in Education, Events Past, Media, Programs, Rescues, SNAP-2 IT's Blog

TNR, Marietta Colony (September 2012)

Although our Marietta homeowner loves cats – and is happy to take care of the kittens that consistently showed up at her Marietta, GA home – after the third litter in rapid succession, this animal lover contacted SNAP for assistance.  In early September, SNAP volunteers trapped 4 adults and 3 kittens, neutered, and then released them to the homeowner’s care. Seven cats that are no longer reproducing may  like a small number to some.  Actually, shutting down the reproductive pathways of even a small number like 7 averts hundreds, thousands, and potentially tens of thousands of unwanted feline births downstream. SNAP thanks you for your continued support that allows us to continue as a resource to the...

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