TNR

Jefferson Street TNR Update

Posted by in Call to Help, Donate, Education, Events, Media, TNR

Jefferson Street TNR Update

Jefferson Street and Asford Park TNR Project The original Jefferson Street project has grown from TNR and rescue for cats at the first Jefferson Street home to a second home in Asford Park and the surrounding neighborhood. To date we have rescued and put into our Adoption program more than 30 kittens and trapped,neutered,returned (TNR) some 30 adult cats to be a monitored colony in the neighborhood. To date neighbors from the Jefferson Street area have donated nearly $1600 but we urgently need an additional $2500 to complete our TNR and Adoption efforts in the surrouding Asford Park neighborhood. IMPORTANT: If you see a cat in your neighborhood that has a tipped ear like the ones shown above, the cat is a TNR cat that has been spay/neutered by Snap and is part of the managed colony of outdoor cats in your area. If you wee a cat that DOES NOT HAVE A TIPPED EAR, please contact Snap or Stephanie Drilling through your neighborhood bulletin board and we will make arrangements to trap, spay/neuter and treat the cat for any infections such as worms, and as appropriate make arrangements for return or adoption. It is important that the neighbors of the Ashford Park area be vigilant on this matter so that the cats of the neighborhood can maintian a stable, healthy and controlled presence in the neighborhood and not have more litters moving forward. Donating Please donate today to help us complete and maintain these cats for the good of the Asford Park neighborhood: Donate securely to the Asford Park TNR Project through YouCaring.com Ear Tipping Eartipping is an effective and universally accepted method to identify a spayed or neutered and vaccinated feral cat. It is the removal of the distal one-quarter of a cat’s left ear, which is approximately 3/8 inch, or 1 cm, in an adult and proportionally smaller in a kitten. This procedure is performed under sterile conditions while the cat is already anesthetized for spay or neuter surgery. There is little or no bleeding, it is relatively painless to the cat, and the eartip does not significantly alter the appearance or beauty of the cat. Eartipping is the preferred method to identify spayed or neutered and vaccinated feral cats, because it is difficult to get close to feral cats, and therefore the identification must be visible from a distance. Feral cats may interact with a variety of caregivers, veterinarians, and animal control personnel during their lives and so immediate visual identification is necessary to prevent an unnecessary second trapping and surgery. No other method of identification has proven to be as safe or as effective as eartipping. Scaredy Cat Rescue and other humane groups across the country do not support the following methods: Tattooing is not effective because the tattoo is not visible until cats are trapped and anesthetized. Eartags are ineffective because they can cause infection, drop off, or tear cats’ ears. Collars are not safe or practical for feral cats, because: as the cats grow and gain weight, the collars will tighten and could strangle them; the collars could get caught on something and severely injure or kill the cats; and the collars could also fall off leaving the cats unidentified. Microchipping alone is not effective because it does not allow for visual identification. It is only effective once cats have been trapped and taken to a shelter or clinic that uses a scanner to find implanted microchips. It does not prevent unnecessary trapping. Questions? Please contact us at tnr@snap2it.org. Preview all our available cats, kittens, dogs and puppies. Learn more about volunteering...

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Jefferson Street Neighborhood Bands Together, Rescues 45 Cats & Dogs

Posted by in Education, Media, TNR

Jefferson Street Neighborhood Bands Together, Rescues 45 Cats & Dogs

SNAP TNR Success The week of June 29 SNAP helped a Jefferson Street Neighborhood near Peachtree Dekalb airport aid 7 dogs, spay/neuter 17 adult cats and rescue 21 kittens.  The 17 adult cats were altered, vetted and cleared for diseases and returned to their neighborhood as part of SNAP’s TNR (Trap, Neuter, Return) program. The 17 kittens and will be placed in loving homes through SNAP’s Adoption program. Funding to support SNAP’s TNR efforts is provided through a generous grant from Second Life Atlanta in Avondale Estates – Second Life are two upscale thrift stores dedicated to the mission of giving homeless pets a second chance in life. Read more about Second Life at Second Life Atlanta and please visit them and shop there to support SNAP and other animal rescue efforts. Cost However, funding to support SNAP’s Adoption efforts is still needed and we hope the residents of the Jefferson Street neighborhood can help cover the estimated $2000 in vet bills and vaccination fees needed to help these kittens and find them loving homes. SNAP received an email from a neighbor telling us about a woman in the Jefferson street area needing our help. The woman has always had cats, but neighbors were becoming concerned that the situation had gotten out of control. Clues One clue to the neighbors was a “Free kittens to good homes” sign that appeared in the woman’s yard. Another clue was there appeared to be a more than usual number of feral cats around the house. Helping Neighbors Snap was asked by a neighbor to help. We were initially told to expect about 12 feral cats and 5 kittens outside and perhaps 8 more kittens inside. Snap contacted the woman and offered assistance – fortunately, she was grateful for the outreach and agreed that we could help her get the situation under control. TNR On the first day, SNAP transported 18 cats from the property that were to be fixed. Three were adult females from inside the home, and 13 were adults living outside, who had to be (humanely) trapped. Additionally, four more semi-feral small kittens were trapped who are now in a foster home being socialized for being around humans so they can be adopted to loving homes. On day two, SNAP re-visited the property and trapped one more kitten and three more adults. There is still one elusive adult to be trapped – the now infamous black and white male who was not a constant eater at the property but on day one of trapping, he was stalking the traps to keep other cats away.  Snap addressed this by shooing him off, but he has yet to be trapped himself. Outcome The final count is SNAP trapped 17 outside adult ferals for our TNR program, and 6 kittens that we have taken into our Adoption program. Inside the home there are 7 dogs and one was recently rescued while running down Clairmont road – she is a young  female that needs to be fixed. The other dogs are all fixed, but inside the home there were issues with fleas that had to be addressed with medication. Health & Wellness SNAP provided three months of flea meds for each dog and also inside the home are 16 more kittens that are already socialized. They have small colds, and are underweight from not being feed kitten food. Snap had provided medication and kitten dry and wet food for them. SNAP also went by and treated each kitten for fleas and tapeworms. SNAP will return in a week and start vaccinations and deworm them for a second round. We also have been told...

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